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Below is a list of all the recently added content, ordered from newest to oldest.

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"This hotel in New Glasgow, began as a real farm, with a big house to accommodate many families, the Rudy and Rosenberg groups. Necessity during hard times created a hotel, with smaller cabins alongside. One of the small cabins was called Westmount -- for the fancier people. This establishment was kept up until the 1950s, when St. Agathe started to pull vacationers away. It then became a private house again." Michael Litvack, artist.
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"The passing of the era: from horse to Model A Ford. The horse was still used until the 1950s, as a working animal on the farms, but its days were numbered." Michael Litvack, artist
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"Fort Rose School was in operation in New Glasgow from 1831 until 1953. Like most of the area, the settlers of New Glasgow were from Scotland, and brought their Scottish heritage, and their names, with them. The school’s claim to fame was that Wilfred Laurier was sent here as a child from St. Lin, up the road, to learn English… which he did. The teacher in the last years was a Miss Smith, who taught Grades 1 through 6. The schoolhouse is now an antique shop." Michael Litvack, artist
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This rendition of the Shawbridge grocery store and snack bar once owned by Henry Bishinsky is by artist Michael Litvack. The artist was inspired by the photograph featured on this website in an article by Brian Rothberg. Rothberg, Bishinsky's grandson, is now the owner of the artwork. QAHN reproduces the painting here with permission of the artist.
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Ancienne carte postale photo, vers 1910. / Early photo postcard, c.1910.
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Ancienne carte postale photographique amateure, vers 1910. / Early amateur photo postcard, c.1910.
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St. Mungo's Church homecoming celebration, July 23, 2016. (Photo - MF)
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QAHN's booth at the St. Mungo's Church homecoming in Cushing, on July 23, 2016, was quite busy -- at least until the rain came down! (Photo - M. Farfan)
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Ancienne acrte postale, vers 1910. / Early postcard, c.1910.
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Dans les Laurentides : ancienne carte postale photographique teinte à la main, vers 1910. / In the Laurentians: early hand-tinted photographic postcard, c. 1910.
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--April 5, 2016. It was not quite dancing in the streets. More accurately, there was a lot of strolling and conversation. Between World Wars I and II Shawbridge was a magnet for the residents of Montreal's teeming Jewish neighbourhoods. Road access was poor but the train made the little community on the lower side of the bridge, across the North River a welcome respite from the city. Shawbridge served as a summer resort destination. There were cottages available to rent weekly or for the season and modest hotel/rooming houses.
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This online exhibition, which consists of 10 panels, is part of QAHN's Canadian Heritage-funded project "Housewife Heroines: Anglophone Women at Home in Montreal during World War II."
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Ancienne carte postale photographique / Early photographic postcard.
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Ancienne carte postale photographique / Early photographic postcard.
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Stonefield et Rivière des Outaouais, vers 1920. Ancienne carte postale photographique. (N.B.: Stonefield n'est pas loins de Grenville). / Stonefield and Ottawa River, c.1920. Early photographic postcard. (N.B.: Stonefield is not far from Grenville).
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Rawdon, v. 1915. Ancienne carte postale photographique. / Rawdon, c.1915. Early photographic postcard.