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Below is a list of all the recently added content, ordered from newest to oldest.

(History Article)
St. Mungo's Church (Presbyterian), a solid structure, built after the fashion of the old style Scotch country-parish churches, stands in a fine position on the bank of the Ottawa River, about midway between the villages of Grenville and Carillon.
(History Article)
This pleasant little village or hamlet, which has recently sprung into some prominence on account of being the site of the Cartridge Factory, and near the lately discovered granite quarry, was, in early years, made a place of no little importance by the erection of Brown's mills.
(History Article)
Though considerable pains were taken to obtain a more complete history of the Anglican Church here, they were fruitless... Itinerant ministers visited St.
(History Article)
This place is located on the Ottawa, about three and a half miles west of Grenville, and it is doubtful if the scenery around it is surpassed in beauty by that of any other village in the province. It is situated on a high, level tract of ground less than half a mile in breadth, which is bounded by the river on the south, and on the north by a mountain rising abruptly, and running parallel with the river.
(History Article)
This place, the chef-lieu of the county of Argenteuil, is located on the North River, 9 miles from the Ottawa and 44 north of Montreal. It is also on the line of the Canadian Pacific Railway, -- formerly the Q. M. O. & O. Railway.
(History Article)
This township is bounded on the north by Mille Isles, east by the Seignory of Two Mountains, south by the Seignory of Argenteuil, and west by Wentworth, and contains about 23,660 acres and the usual allowance for highways. It has several beautiful little lakes, and much fine scenery.
(History Article)
Two competing waves of migrationto the Laurentians got under wayin the early 1840s, according to historian Serge Laurin. One, says Laurin, wasFrench-Canadian and Catholic, the other wasEnglish-Canadian and Protestant. Both occurred at precisely the same time; both followed different routes.
(History Article)
Curé Antoine Labelle could not have developed the upper Laurentians if he had not been empowered and supported by Ignace Bourget, Bishop of Montreal. Bourget was one of the most powerful clerics in Quebec during the 19th century. From his inauguration in 1840 to his death in 1885, he led the Quebec clergy in filling a leadership vacuum in French Canada. The Laurentian colonisation and the creation of the towns north of Ste. Agathe were among the many accomplishments of the clergy, but they could not tolerate criticism.
(History Article)
Lachute is at the centre of the early English-speaking settlements of the Laurentians, and many historic trails lead back to it. There is no mystery as to where its name came from, though. Both La Riviere du Nord and La Chute appeared on maps made during the French regime, prior to 1760 and the property was designated as a seigneury as early as 1682. All the same, the land where the town is today and some of its surrounding area was once described as Lane's Purchase, and was first officially called the Parish of St-Jerusalem.
(History Article)
1) Brownsburg is named in whose honour? a) William Brown, who established a brewery there, the first in Canada. b) George Brown, an early pioneer who built a mill. c) Jeremiah Brown, a Methodist preacher. d) None of the above. The town is actually named after a village in England.
(History Article)
The tiny Lower Laurentian hamlet of Mille Isles was once a thriving town centre for an active pioneer farming community. Settlement began as early as the 1830s by mainly Irish Protestant emigrants. Today the Municipality of Mille Isles, which is only a 40-minute drive from Montreal, is a growing residential area for both commuters and second homes on its many small lakes.
(History Article)
Author’s note: From response received from visitors to the Rawdon Historical Society website, there seems to be a great interest in Rawdon during the middle of the last century. In response to this interest, I have dug out my collection of the Rawdon News Bulletins and tried to portray Rawdon as it was at that particular time. I admit to using this source extensively for the following article, but I know that the editor and his staff would give whole hearted approval, were they still here.
(History Article)
This Georgian house was built in the 1830s for Col. Charles MacDonell, an officer in the British army, who organized the Argenteuil Rangers during the 1837 Rebellion. He married Ann Turner, the niece of the English painter J.
(History Article)
The many stone buildings in Cushing attest to its importance as a commercial centre in the 19th century. Lemuel Cushing, said to have been the most successful businessman in the county, built this imposing store in the 1830s.
(History Article)
Grenville had a military presence because of the canal. The original canal was designed and constructed by the Royal Engineers between 1819 and 1833. It was part of the St. Lawrence, Ottawa, and Rideau system which was built at a time when the United States' threat was real. Next to the canal is the lock-keeper's house.
(History Article)
Sometimes called "the Barracks", as it was commandeered by the British army and used to house soldiers during the Rebellion of 1837, this building was originally erected by General C. J. Forbes as a warehouse to protect equipment serving the old Carillon Canal. Later, it became the Sovereign Hotel, and in 1934, with the help of Dr. Maude Abbott and Dr.
(History Article)
Naming the Laurentians: A History of Place Names "Up North," isthe title of a new book written by Joseph Graham,and published by Les Éditions Main Street Inc. An anthology of stories about Laurentian places and how they got their names, it covers centuries and involves peoples and nations from far and wide.
(History Article)
Doctor, researcher, teacher, writer, and curator: “It’s doubtful if any one person did more in her generation, to make McGill known throughout the medical world” than did Maude Abbott, who was born and raised in St.
(History Article)
Ste. Agathe and the surrounding lakes have been the favoured destination of generations of North Americans. Ours is a Quebec town that has absorbed and reflects all of the various cultural influences that make up Canada.The indigenous peoples, the Weskarinis-Algonkians, wintered in our area for centuries before their fateful defeat at the hands of the Iroquois in 1651. Even so, its name may well come from the Algonkian word Mittawang, meaning sandy shores.In 1849 the first hardy settlers arrived, a handful of families with descendants in the community to this day.
(History Article)
Where the North River divides the first mountain ranges of the Laurentians from the St. Lawrence plains, the settlement of what later became Shawbridge was established in the early nineteenth century.
(History Article)
The earliest nineteenth century settlements of the Laurentians were intended to be agricultural, in spite of the unpromising terrain and the very short growing season.
(History Article)
Tracing your family roots can be challenging, many times disappointing, more often that not frustrating yet rewarding. As I have been “chasing down” my family, I have been fortunate to have made contacts with other individuals who not only share the passion for genealogy, but our families are sometimes related to each other. Our paths crossed by way of Argenteuil and Terrebonne counties in Quebec and sometimes in Montreal.
(History Article)
A major concern for the entire historical community of Quebec has been, and remains, our vast and varied religious heritage. Regardless of language or denomination, our cities, towns and countryside are populated by empty, or seasonal, or much diminished churches, many of which have old cemeteries attached to them.
(History Article)
The Township of Abercrombie, comprising Shawbridge, a part of Piedmont, the village of Ste. Adele, and Fourteen Island Lake, was named for General James Abercromby. Exactly why he should have been so honoured is a bit of a mystery. It could be someone’s sense of humour — an encrypted message to the future inviting us to look back and see that the victors in war are not always winners.