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Below is a list of all the recently added content, ordered from newest to oldest.

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"The Opera Bottling Plant was a small local distributor of soft drinks. This painting shows a local grocery store in St. Agathe in the late 1940s, with the soft drink signage." Michael Litvack, artist
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"St. Sophie was the egg producing capital of Quebec...here is one of the Gontovnick chicken houses." Michael Litvack, artist
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"Willie Rudy was an exceptional man. Born in New Glasgow, Quebec, he was a simple farmer. He learned to speak six languages in dealing with his multi-ethnic neighbours. After serving many years on council, he served two terms as Mayor. What made his unique was the fact that he was the only Jewish mayor in a rural town in Quebec. The time frame for this painting is mid 1950s." Michael Litvack, artist
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Only $30 / 1 year, $75 / 3 yrs, or $120 / 5 years home@qahn.org / Toll free: (877) 964-0409 Paypal: http://qahn.org/join-qahn
(History Article)
--November 23, 2016. 1) d (now Brownsburg-Chatham) 2) c (François-Xavier-Antoine Labelle, sometimes called the "King of the North") 3) a 4) b 5) a 6) a 7) b 8) d 9) b 10) a
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--November 23, 2016.
(History Article)
--November 22, 2016. 1) b 2) d 3) b 4) d 5) c 6) a 7) b 8) a 9) c 10) b
(History Article)
--November 22, 2016. 1) This early postcard shows the start of the canal in what Lower Laurentians village? a) Carillon b) Grenville c) St. Andrew's East d) Rideau
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The old Fort Rose School in New Glasgow, Quebec, was "a one room building with grades 1 to 7 all being taught at the same time. The teacher was Miss Smith, who taught many children in the area, from mere toddlers to teenagers. She lived directly across the road from the school, making life easier for her. (The small store is my idea, as the original house had the extra room added sometime in the 1960s.)"
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Some of the participants at QAHN's final "Volunteering Matters" Conference, held in Morin Heights in October 2016. (Photo - Sandra Stock)
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In collaboration with the Morin Heights Historical Association, QAHN hosted the final conference in its very successful "Volunteering Matters" series in Morin Heights on October 28, 2016. Guest speakers were Kira Page and Juniper Belshaw of the Centre for Community Organizations of Montreal. Seen here (left to right): Don Stewart of the MHHA; Kira Page; Matthew Farfan (QAHN's Executive Director); Heather Darch (QAHN Project Manager; Sandra Stock (QAHN Director); and Juniper Belshaw.
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QAHN, in collaboration with the Morin Heights Historical Association, hosted its final "Volunteering Matters" conference in Morin Heights on October 28, 2016. Guest speakers were Kira Page and Juniper Belshaw of the Centre for Community Organizations of Montreal. (Photo - M. Farfan)
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"Here is the General Store in Val-David, exact date unknown, but depicted as of the end of the 1940s... The Shawbridge bakery truck was everywhere, supplying the countryside with fresh baked European-style bakery products. The truck would go, door to door, community to community..." Michael Litvack, artist
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"The place where little boys' dreams almost came true, The Roxy, and the Alhambra, provided the summer crowds with movies, cartoons, news of the Korean War, as well as the Red Ball Express, Scaramoche, and Moonlight Bay. Kids were allowed in, unlike in Montreal since the great fire. After the film, a smoke burger with a vanilla Coke at the Laurentian Bar. Down the street, at the corner of St. Vincent and Principale, the Shell station provided service, while the same corner, in the late 1940s, had a rooming house and the old pharmacy." Michael Litvack, artist
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"In the 1960s, through to the mid 1990s, a basic food group was supplied by this tiny roadside stand just outside of St. Agathe. Chez Euclid and Le Michigan were busy supplying hot dogs, chips, and all varieties of liqueurs douces from their floor coolers. Nesbitt’s, Snow White, Gurds,Uptown, and biere d’epinnette were all favourites, for a dime." Michael Litvack, artist
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"The war brought everyone in, from large cities and tiny towns. Here is Max Polsky, dressed in uniform, in front of the general stores of Saint Sophie. The KIK soft drink signs were everywhere, but there were a great many in Saint Sophie which was the origin of the soft drink. The small grocery stores of the day all seemed to have the Salada Tea stickers on their windows. The Pepsi Cola, Seven-Up, and KIK Cola signage is all period correct." Michael Litvack, artist
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"The store that provided just about everything for the little community… Food, candy, newspapers, land for sale, and antiques upstairs. St. Sophie was Quebec’s egg capital, supplying the markets of Montreal. The Goodz name is still is seen in St. Sophie… Putter’s Pickles still in packing local cucumbers and peppers. Michael Litvack, artist.
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"This hotel in New Glasgow, began as a real farm, with a big house to accommodate many families, the Rudy and Rosenberg groups. Necessity during hard times created a hotel, with smaller cabins alongside. One of the small cabins was called Westmount -- for the fancier people. This establishment was kept up until the 1950s, when St. Agathe started to pull vacationers away. It then became a private house again." Michael Litvack, artist.
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"The passing of the era: from horse to Model A Ford. The horse was still used until the 1950s, as a working animal on the farms, but its days were numbered." Michael Litvack, artist
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"Fort Rose School was in operation in New Glasgow from 1831 until 1953. Like most of the area, the settlers of New Glasgow were from Scotland, and brought their Scottish heritage, and their names, with them. The school’s claim to fame was that Wilfred Laurier was sent here as a child from St. Lin, up the road, to learn English… which he did. The teacher in the last years was a Miss Smith, who taught Grades 1 through 6. The choolhouse is now an antique shop." Michael Litvack, artist
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This rendition of the Shawbridge grocery store and snack bar once owned by Henry Bishinsky is by artist Michael Litvack. The artist was inspired by the photograph featured on this website in an article by Brian Rothberg. Rothberg, Bishinsky's grandson, is now the owner of the artwork. QAHN reproduces the painting here with permission of the artist.
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Ancienne carte postale photo, vers 1910. / Early photo postcard, c.1910.
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Ancienne carte postale photographique amateure, vers 1910. / Early amateur photo postcard, c.1910.