Skip to main content

MASON’S FALLS, RAWDON

Printer-friendly versionPrinter-friendly version

The original dam above Mason Falls, built c.1921. The old Mason homestead can be seen in the background, not far from where the Heather Lodge was built in 1939. (Photo - Rawdon Historical Society)The first settlement at Rawdon occurred in the lower corners of the township early in the nineteenth century possibly between 1815 and 1820. As settlers pushed toward the interior of the area they were confronted by steep rocky hills leading to a plateau before the mountains, and two rivers that created waterfalls where they tumbled over the rocks heading down to the flatlands. There were four falls of varying heights in Rawdon Township, three on the Ouareau River, and one, Mason’s Falls on the Red River.

Although Mason’s Falls is neither the highest nor the lowest of these, it is very picturesqueand is alsothe most accessible of the three remaining falls.

Mason's Mill, early 1900s. Some of the original foundation stones are still visible today. (Photo - Rawdon Historical Society)Although the Red River was dammed just above the falls around 1921, thisdid not detract from the beauty of the spot. In spring, when the snow melts in the mountains above, the water rushes and roars over the rocks, misting and foaming.

Summer brings a more sedate fall with the water tumbling headlong over the rocks to the river beyond and winding its way down to St. Liguori de Montcalm. In winter, the banks are cloaked in a mantle of snow and ice while the falls are white and misted in the cold air.

If you know where to look, the remains of foundations from a sawmill can be seen on one bank. This mill was known as Mason’s Mill as the Mason family owned the land around this section of the river and supposedly built this mill around 1865. To learn more about this Mason family, click here: http://www.education.mcgill.ca/rawdon/masonintro.htm.